Are art professionals today too hyperactively busy to produce work of lasting importance?

http://conversations.e-flux.com/t/are-art-professionals-today-too-hyperactively-busy-to-produce-work-of-lasting-importance/528

“Art professionals today are notoriously busy. They are ceaselessly writing, networking, traveling, tweeting, attending openings, managing their “brand,” and responding to emails. This level of hyperactivity is perhaps required today in order to earn even a modest living in the art world. But how does it affect the work that’s produced, and the discourse about this work? Has the obligation to produce something eclipsed the slow, patient work of producing something good? Does the endless stream of art commentary, on the internet and in print, sacrifice depth of analysis for sheer quantity?”

On trends

http://cphmag.com/on-trends/

“It is easy finding an audience when what you are doing already is being given a lot of attention. But it is a lot harder – and a lot more challenging – to try to find an audience when that’s not the case, even when the photography in question lives up to the highest standards. That’s a tough spot to be in. But I think it’s the only spot that in the long run is worth anything. This is especially true given that there are in fact ways to get the work seen after all. It might “only” require a bit more work, or different, maybe even unorthodox, approaches.”

Art Without Artists?

http://www.e-flux.com/journal/art-without-artists/

“An artist can aspire to a certain sovereignty, which today implies that in addition to producing art, one also has to produce the conditions that enable such production, its channels of circulation. Sometimes the production of these conditions can become so critical to the production of work that it assumes the shape of the work itself. This should not be confused with the job curators have and the work they do. As an artist, I would not attempt to propose a solution for curators; they themselves need to come up with ways of thinking and working that do not undercut the sovereignty of artists.”