Richard Prince, social media and the public domain

http://www.artlawreport.com/2015/05/29/richard-prince-social-media-and-the-public-domain-reports-of-copyrights-demise-are-premature/

suicidegirls.com

suicidegirls.com

“The point here is not that Prince will be found liable for infringement; in the grand scheme, he probably won’t. But assuming that any image on the Internet is fair game for any other use because Prince can do what he does is to take a huge risk, and one that should not be done cavalierly.  Copyright may seem outdated, but it’s the law, and Richard Prince probably won’t be there to defend you when that time comes.”

Kim Kardashian photobook

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2015/may/05/kim-kardashian-selfish-book-photography-selfies

 

@kimkardashian

 

@kimkardashian

 

“Kim Kardashian has come not to praise the photography book, but to bury it. Her new book, Selfish, is the ultimate slap in the face for anyone who ever pointed a camera with high hopes of being the new Henri Cartier-Bresson or Don McCullin and getting their sensitive snaps published in a moving monograph called The Gangs of Leeds, perhaps, or The Last Fish and Chip Shop.”

War photography in the age of social media

https://newhumanist.org.uk/4857/war-photography-in-the-age-of-social-media

 

Robert Capa / Magnum photos

Robert Capa / Magnum photos

Lowe is not afraid to turn the flashlight on his own profession. He told me how, in his doctoral thesis submitted last year, he argues that simply “witnessing” is morally distinct from “bearing witness”; the latter, he tells me, is an “active process of testimony” going beyond saying simply, “This is what I saw”. In bearing witness, photographers move past a “passive” presentation of the situation to what Lowe calls a “more accurate process of engagement with it”. A photographer bearing witness, Lowe says, is often providing a “testimony about – and very often on behalf of – someone who can’t provide that testimony”.”

Why does our Instagram generation think its snaps are so special?

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2015/feb/03/instagram-generation-amateur-photographers-art-plagiarism

“… it all gets daft when amateur snappers think they are artists.”

“Photography can easily degenerate into a pseudo-art, with millions of people all taking pictures of the same things and all thinking we are special.

This amateur delusion of photographic art is everywhere today – from Instagram to the streets and hills, where there is always someone taking their holiday snaps too damn seriously.”